A clinical trial to improve high blood pressure care in young urban black men recruitment, follow-up, and outcomes

Martha Hill, Lee R Bone, Sterling C. Hilton, Mary C. Roary, Gabor D Kelen, David Levine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This randomized trial recruited and followed underserved, inner-city, hypertensive (HTN), young black men and investigated whether a nurse- community health worker team in combination with usual medical care (SI) increased entry into care and reduced high blood pressure (HBP), in comparison to usual medical care (UC) alone. Emergency department records, advertising, and BP screenings identified potential participants with HBP. Telephone calls and personal contacts tracked enrollees. Of 1391 potential participants, 803 (58%) responded to an invitation to be screened and scheduled a visit. Of these, 528 (66%) kept an appointment, 207 (35%) were BP eligible, and 204 (99%) consented to enroll. At 12 months 91% of men were accounted for and 85.8% (adjusted for death, in jail, or moved away) were seen. Mean BP changed from 153(16)/98(10) to 152(19)/94(11) mm Hg in the SI group and 151(18)/98(11) to 147(21)/92(14) mm Hg in the UC group (P = NS). High rates of participation are attainable in this population; however, culturally acceptable ways of delivering HBP care are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)548-554
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Hypertension
Volume12
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1999

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Clinical Trials
Hypertension
Telephone
Hospital Emergency Service
Appointments and Schedules
Nurses
Population

Keywords

  • Follow-up
  • Hypertension
  • Randomized clinical trial
  • Recruitment
  • Young black men

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

A clinical trial to improve high blood pressure care in young urban black men recruitment, follow-up, and outcomes. / Hill, Martha; Bone, Lee R; Hilton, Sterling C.; Roary, Mary C.; Kelen, Gabor D; Levine, David.

In: American Journal of Hypertension, Vol. 12, No. 6, 06.1999, p. 548-554.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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