A clinical trial of the effects of dietary patterns on blood pressure

Lawrence Appel, T. J. Moore, E. Obarzanek, W. M. Vollmer, L. P. Svetkey, F. M. Sacks, G. A. Bray, T. M. Vogt, J. A. Cutler, M. M. Windhauser, P. H. Lin, Edgar R Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: It is known that obesity, sodium intake, and alcohol consumption influence blood pressure. In this clinical trial, Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, we assessed the effects of dietary patterns on blood pressure. Methods: We enrolled 459 adults with systolic blood pressures of less than 160 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressures of 80 to 95 mm Hg. For three weeks, the subjects were fed a control diet that was low in fruits, vegetables, and dairy products, with a fat content typical of the average diet in the United States. They were then randomly assigned to receive for eight weeks the control diet, a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, or a 'combination' diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy products and with reduced saturated and total fat. Sodium intake and body weight were maintained at constant levels. Results: At base line, the mean (±SD) systolic and diastolic blood pressures were 131.3±10.8 mm Hg and 84.7±4.7 mm Hg, respectively. The combination diet reduced systolic and diastolic blood pressure by 5.5 and 3.0 mm Hg more, respectively, than the control diet (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1117-1124
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine
Volume8
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1997

Fingerprint

Blood pressure
Nutrition
Clinical Trials
Blood Pressure
Diet
Vegetables
Fruits
Oils and fats
Dairy products
Fats
Fruit
Dairy Products
Sodium
Alcohols
Alcohol Drinking
Obesity
Body Weight
Hypertension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Bioengineering
  • Chemical Engineering(all)

Cite this

Appel, L., Moore, T. J., Obarzanek, E., Vollmer, W. M., Svetkey, L. P., Sacks, F. M., ... Miller, E. R. (1997). A clinical trial of the effects of dietary patterns on blood pressure. Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine, 8(4), 1117-1124.

A clinical trial of the effects of dietary patterns on blood pressure. / Appel, Lawrence; Moore, T. J.; Obarzanek, E.; Vollmer, W. M.; Svetkey, L. P.; Sacks, F. M.; Bray, G. A.; Vogt, T. M.; Cutler, J. A.; Windhauser, M. M.; Lin, P. H.; Miller, Edgar R.

In: Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine, Vol. 8, No. 4, 1997, p. 1117-1124.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Appel, L, Moore, TJ, Obarzanek, E, Vollmer, WM, Svetkey, LP, Sacks, FM, Bray, GA, Vogt, TM, Cutler, JA, Windhauser, MM, Lin, PH & Miller, ER 1997, 'A clinical trial of the effects of dietary patterns on blood pressure', Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine, vol. 8, no. 4, pp. 1117-1124.
Appel L, Moore TJ, Obarzanek E, Vollmer WM, Svetkey LP, Sacks FM et al. A clinical trial of the effects of dietary patterns on blood pressure. Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine. 1997;8(4):1117-1124.
Appel, Lawrence ; Moore, T. J. ; Obarzanek, E. ; Vollmer, W. M. ; Svetkey, L. P. ; Sacks, F. M. ; Bray, G. A. ; Vogt, T. M. ; Cutler, J. A. ; Windhauser, M. M. ; Lin, P. H. ; Miller, Edgar R. / A clinical trial of the effects of dietary patterns on blood pressure. In: Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine. 1997 ; Vol. 8, No. 4. pp. 1117-1124.
@article{83d08a45b1a54f4fa78c430438770aa4,
title = "A clinical trial of the effects of dietary patterns on blood pressure",
abstract = "Background: It is known that obesity, sodium intake, and alcohol consumption influence blood pressure. In this clinical trial, Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, we assessed the effects of dietary patterns on blood pressure. Methods: We enrolled 459 adults with systolic blood pressures of less than 160 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressures of 80 to 95 mm Hg. For three weeks, the subjects were fed a control diet that was low in fruits, vegetables, and dairy products, with a fat content typical of the average diet in the United States. They were then randomly assigned to receive for eight weeks the control diet, a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, or a 'combination' diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy products and with reduced saturated and total fat. Sodium intake and body weight were maintained at constant levels. Results: At base line, the mean (±SD) systolic and diastolic blood pressures were 131.3±10.8 mm Hg and 84.7±4.7 mm Hg, respectively. The combination diet reduced systolic and diastolic blood pressure by 5.5 and 3.0 mm Hg more, respectively, than the control diet (P",
author = "Lawrence Appel and Moore, {T. J.} and E. Obarzanek and Vollmer, {W. M.} and Svetkey, {L. P.} and Sacks, {F. M.} and Bray, {G. A.} and Vogt, {T. M.} and Cutler, {J. A.} and Windhauser, {M. M.} and Lin, {P. H.} and Miller, {Edgar R}",
year = "1997",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "8",
pages = "1117--1124",
journal = "Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine",
issn = "0957-4530",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A clinical trial of the effects of dietary patterns on blood pressure

AU - Appel, Lawrence

AU - Moore, T. J.

AU - Obarzanek, E.

AU - Vollmer, W. M.

AU - Svetkey, L. P.

AU - Sacks, F. M.

AU - Bray, G. A.

AU - Vogt, T. M.

AU - Cutler, J. A.

AU - Windhauser, M. M.

AU - Lin, P. H.

AU - Miller, Edgar R

PY - 1997

Y1 - 1997

N2 - Background: It is known that obesity, sodium intake, and alcohol consumption influence blood pressure. In this clinical trial, Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, we assessed the effects of dietary patterns on blood pressure. Methods: We enrolled 459 adults with systolic blood pressures of less than 160 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressures of 80 to 95 mm Hg. For three weeks, the subjects were fed a control diet that was low in fruits, vegetables, and dairy products, with a fat content typical of the average diet in the United States. They were then randomly assigned to receive for eight weeks the control diet, a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, or a 'combination' diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy products and with reduced saturated and total fat. Sodium intake and body weight were maintained at constant levels. Results: At base line, the mean (±SD) systolic and diastolic blood pressures were 131.3±10.8 mm Hg and 84.7±4.7 mm Hg, respectively. The combination diet reduced systolic and diastolic blood pressure by 5.5 and 3.0 mm Hg more, respectively, than the control diet (P

AB - Background: It is known that obesity, sodium intake, and alcohol consumption influence blood pressure. In this clinical trial, Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, we assessed the effects of dietary patterns on blood pressure. Methods: We enrolled 459 adults with systolic blood pressures of less than 160 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressures of 80 to 95 mm Hg. For three weeks, the subjects were fed a control diet that was low in fruits, vegetables, and dairy products, with a fat content typical of the average diet in the United States. They were then randomly assigned to receive for eight weeks the control diet, a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, or a 'combination' diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy products and with reduced saturated and total fat. Sodium intake and body weight were maintained at constant levels. Results: At base line, the mean (±SD) systolic and diastolic blood pressures were 131.3±10.8 mm Hg and 84.7±4.7 mm Hg, respectively. The combination diet reduced systolic and diastolic blood pressure by 5.5 and 3.0 mm Hg more, respectively, than the control diet (P

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=8244264753&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=8244264753&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 9099655

AN - SCOPUS:8244264753

VL - 8

SP - 1117

EP - 1124

JO - Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine

JF - Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine

SN - 0957-4530

IS - 4

ER -