A change of position for neurogenic pulmonary edema

Scott A. Marshall, Paul A Nyquist

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Stroke is the third most common cause of death in the Western World and is a condition seen by Neurologists, General Physicians and Primary Care Physicians. Neurogenic pulmonary edema can complicate the management of large strokes and cerebral hemorrhage. While the principles of management of this type of pulmonary edema are similar to the more common cardiogenic pulmonary edema, placing a patient in the prone position may be a helpful maneuver facilitating recovery. Methods: We describe a case of basilar thrombosis treated with intra-arterial thrombolysis where prone ventilation was employed to treat neurogenic cardio-pulmonary complications. Results: This resulted in rapid resolution of neurogenic pulmonary edema and patient recovery after recanulation of the basilar artery by intra-arterial urokinase. Conclusion: This technique of prone positioning for ventilation is of importance to physicians who manage stroke and its complications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)213-217
Number of pages5
JournalNeurocritical Care
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2009

Fingerprint

Pulmonary Edema
Stroke
Ventilation
Physicians
Prone Position
Western World
Basilar Artery
Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator
Cerebral Hemorrhage
Primary Care Physicians
Cause of Death
Thrombosis
Lung

Keywords

  • Adult respiratory distress syndrome
  • Basilar artery thrombosis
  • Neurogenic pulmonary edema
  • Prone ventilation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

A change of position for neurogenic pulmonary edema. / Marshall, Scott A.; Nyquist, Paul A.

In: Neurocritical Care, Vol. 10, No. 2, 04.2009, p. 213-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Marshall, Scott A. ; Nyquist, Paul A. / A change of position for neurogenic pulmonary edema. In: Neurocritical Care. 2009 ; Vol. 10, No. 2. pp. 213-217.
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