A Central Role for C1q/TNF-Related Protein 13 (CTRP13) in Modulating Food Intake and Body Weight

Mardi S. Byerly, Roy Swanson, Zhikui Wei, Marcus M. Seldin, Patrick S. McCulloh, Guang William Wong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

C1q/TNF-related protein 13 (CTRP13), a hormone secreted by adipose tissue (adipokines), helps regulate glucose metabolism in peripheral tissues. We previously reported that CTRP13 expression is increased in obese and hyperphagic leptin-deficient mice, suggesting that it may modulate food intake and body weight. CTRP13 is also expressed in the brain, although its role in modulating whole-body energy balance remains unknown. Here, we show that CTRP13 is a novel anorexigenic factor in the mouse brain. Quantitative PCR demonstrated that food restriction downregulates Ctrp13 expression in mouse hypothalamus, while high-fat feeding upregulates expression. Central administration of recombinant CTRP13 suppressed food intake and reduced body weight in mice. Further, CTRP13 and the orexigenic neuropeptide agouti-related protein (AgRP) reciprocally regulate each other's expression in the hypothalamus: central delivery of CTRP13 suppressed Agrp expression, while delivery of AgRP increased Ctrp13 expression. Food restriction alone reduced Ctrp13 and increased orexigenic neuropeptide gene (Npy and Agrp) expression in the hypothalamus; in contrast, when food restriction was coupled to enhanced physical activity in an activity-based anorexia (ABA) mouse model, hypothalamic expression of both Ctrp13 and Agrp were upregulated. Taken together, these results suggest that CTRP13 and AgRP form a hypothalamic feedback loop to modulate food intake and that this neural circuit may be disrupted in an anorexic-like condition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere62862
JournalPLoS One
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 25 2013

Fingerprint

food intake
Eating
Body Weight
body weight
Agouti-Related Protein
Proteins
proteins
Agouti
Hypothalamus
hypothalamus
Neuropeptides
Food
Brain
mice
neuropeptides
Tissue
Adipokines
Anorexia
Leptin
Energy balance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

A Central Role for C1q/TNF-Related Protein 13 (CTRP13) in Modulating Food Intake and Body Weight. / Byerly, Mardi S.; Swanson, Roy; Wei, Zhikui; Seldin, Marcus M.; McCulloh, Patrick S.; Wong, Guang William.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 8, No. 4, e62862, 25.04.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Byerly, Mardi S. ; Swanson, Roy ; Wei, Zhikui ; Seldin, Marcus M. ; McCulloh, Patrick S. ; Wong, Guang William. / A Central Role for C1q/TNF-Related Protein 13 (CTRP13) in Modulating Food Intake and Body Weight. In: PLoS One. 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 4.
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