A best-worst scaling experiment to prioritize caregiver concerns about ADHD medication for children

Melissa Ross, John F P Bridges, Xinyi Ng, Lauren D. Wagner, Emily Jane Frosch, Gloria Reeves, Susan DosReis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: The objective of this feasibility study was to develop and pilot an instrument to elicit caregivers' priorities when initiating attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medication for their child. Methods: A best-worst scaling experiment was used to rank competing priorities when initiating ADHD medicine. Forty-six participants were recruited for a two-phase study involving survey development (phase 1, N=21) and the survey pilot (phase 2, N=25). Best-worst scores and 95% confidence intervals indicating the relative importance of 16 concerns were determined, and t tests were used to determine the scores' significance. Results: The significance of best-worst scores for most concerns indicated that the choices were purposeful. Concerns about helping the child become a successful adult, having a doctor who addresses caregivers' concerns, and improving school behavior were ranked highest. Conclusions: The best-worst scaling method can elicit priorities for children's mental health treatment. Future work using this method will guide family-centered care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)208-211
Number of pages4
JournalPsychiatric Services
Volume66
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015

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Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Caregivers
Feasibility Studies
Mental Health
Medicine
Confidence Intervals
Surveys and Questionnaires
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

A best-worst scaling experiment to prioritize caregiver concerns about ADHD medication for children. / Ross, Melissa; Bridges, John F P; Ng, Xinyi; Wagner, Lauren D.; Frosch, Emily Jane; Reeves, Gloria; DosReis, Susan.

In: Psychiatric Services, Vol. 66, No. 2, 01.02.2015, p. 208-211.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ross, Melissa ; Bridges, John F P ; Ng, Xinyi ; Wagner, Lauren D. ; Frosch, Emily Jane ; Reeves, Gloria ; DosReis, Susan. / A best-worst scaling experiment to prioritize caregiver concerns about ADHD medication for children. In: Psychiatric Services. 2015 ; Vol. 66, No. 2. pp. 208-211.
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