3D bioprinting using stem cells

Chin Siang Ong, Pooja Yesantharao, Chen Yu Huang, Gunnar Mattson, Joseph Boktor, Takuma Fukunishi, Huaitao Zhang, Narutoshi Hibino

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Recent advances have allowed for three-dimensional (3D) printing technologies to be applied to biocompatible materials, cells and supporting components, creating a field of 3D bioprinting that holds great promise for artificial organ printing and regenerative medicine. At the same time, stem cells, such as human induced pluripotent stem cells, have driven a paradigm shift in tissue regeneration and the modeling of human disease, and represent an unlimited cell source for tissue regeneration and the study of human disease. The ability to reprogram patient-specific cells holds the promise of an enhanced understanding of disease mechanisms and phenotypic variability. 3D bioprinting has been successfully performed using multiple stem cell types of different lineages and potency. The type of 3D bioprinting employed ranged from microextrusion bioprinting, inkjet bioprinting, laser-assisted bioprinting, to newer technologies such as scaffold-free spheroid-based bioprinting. This review discusses the current advances, applications, limitations and future of 3D bioprinting using stem cells, by organ systems.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages223-231
Number of pages9
JournalPediatric Research
Volume83
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Bioprinting
Stem Cells
Regeneration
Artificial Organs
Technology
Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells
Printing
Regenerative Medicine
Biocompatible Materials
Cell Lineage
Cellular Structures
Lasers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Ong, C. S., Yesantharao, P., Huang, C. Y., Mattson, G., Boktor, J., Fukunishi, T., ... Hibino, N. (2018). 3D bioprinting using stem cells. Pediatric Research, 83(1-2), 223-231. DOI: 10.1038/pr.2017.252

3D bioprinting using stem cells. / Ong, Chin Siang; Yesantharao, Pooja; Huang, Chen Yu; Mattson, Gunnar; Boktor, Joseph; Fukunishi, Takuma; Zhang, Huaitao; Hibino, Narutoshi.

In: Pediatric Research, Vol. 83, No. 1-2, 01.01.2018, p. 223-231.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Ong, CS, Yesantharao, P, Huang, CY, Mattson, G, Boktor, J, Fukunishi, T, Zhang, H & Hibino, N 2018, '3D bioprinting using stem cells' Pediatric Research, vol. 83, no. 1-2, pp. 223-231. DOI: 10.1038/pr.2017.252
Ong CS, Yesantharao P, Huang CY, Mattson G, Boktor J, Fukunishi T et al. 3D bioprinting using stem cells. Pediatric Research. 2018 Jan 1;83(1-2):223-231. Available from, DOI: 10.1038/pr.2017.252
Ong, Chin Siang ; Yesantharao, Pooja ; Huang, Chen Yu ; Mattson, Gunnar ; Boktor, Joseph ; Fukunishi, Takuma ; Zhang, Huaitao ; Hibino, Narutoshi. / 3D bioprinting using stem cells. In: Pediatric Research. 2018 ; Vol. 83, No. 1-2. pp. 223-231
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